Material Girls - MG VS IQ 12" (Vinyl EP)

MATERIAL GIRLS FRONT COVER.jpg
MATERIAL GIRLS FRONT COVER.jpg
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Material Girls - MG VS IQ 12" (Vinyl EP)

12.00

Silkscreened Jackets. Edition of 75.  

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Preceded by a teasing, inconspicuous online presence since the group’s formation in 2016, drag-punk six-piece Material Girls have finally released their highly anticipated debut with the MG VS IQ EP (out July 20 via Irrelevant Music/Chunket). With MG VS IQ, Material Girls enchants with a sultry mix of glam-tinged jazz, rock ’n’ roll and cabaret theatrics that shine in times of spiritual complacency and social ruin. The EP’s opening number, “Drained,” showcases Tyler Jundt’s lustrous trumpet and David Iduate’s arresting saxophone, tempered by eager keys and John Restivo Jr.’s shimmering percussion. One can’t help but mentally wander into a smoke-filled burlesque jazz club bustling with drag queens and other babes of dereliction, as Ben Presley’s flinty guitar struts with his deep, gravelly voice. The upbeat cirque-de-Bowie track “Tightrope” follows, pandering to the nature of fight-or-flight: “Go in for the kill/Stand completely still/Complain about placement/Content and complacent/Make plans for the weekend/Then flake on your friends/Confident and finessing/Make a life of second guessing.” Blaring trumpet and saxophone soulfully command the attention of anyone within earshot as bassist Trey Rosenkampff (who has since been replaced by Meghan Dowlen aka Jade Poppyfield) perks up between Restivo’s juddering percussion and Presley’s piercing guitar riffs. The group settles in with “I Just Want To Fall in Love With Myself,” a six-minute assault on the senses that’s not the catchiest number of the release, but that’s kinda the point. As the EP’s most challenging song, “I Just Want To Fall in Love With Myself” upholds a degree of cacophony with gritty vocals and hunky brass, matched by funhouse elements in a wonky organ and bongos that the listener may not fall in love with right away. Its placement alongside more tantalizing songs proves that the journey through one’s inner turmoils isn’t always glamorous, but it is worthwhile as it wears with time. “Under the Sun” brings MG VS IQ to a close with a surprising burst of raucous, rustic and undeniably catchy guitar riff behind Restivo’s sparring vocals — garrulous with a balance of hubris and desperation. -Creative Loafing Atlanta